The Notes and Commonplace Book of H.P. Lovecraft

The Notes and Commonplace Book of H.P. Lovecraft


$ 12.95




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During his lifetime, HPL kept a listing of story ideas, concepts, and other elements which he might at some point include in his stories. He called this his "commonplace book". In 1938, just after HPL's death, his friend and literary executor, Robert H. Barlow printed HPL's commonplace book in an edition of just 75 copies. We thought it was high time for a new edition of the Commonplace Book, and here it is.

Working from high resolution photos of an original in the Library of Congress, we've created a typographic replica of the 1938 edition. To make it even more fun, we've also included materials Lovecraft wrote after he gave his manuscript to Barlow and which were not included in the 1938 edition. HPL also wrote plot summaries for more than fifty classic horror stories which were similarly omitted and are reproduced here for the first time. This volume also features an Afterword by Sean Branney and Andrew Leman of the H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society.

Fans of HPL will see here many of the initial ideas which Lovecraft later used in the full version of his tales. They'll also gain insights into the creative process of the father of gothic fiction and master of the weird tale, H.P. Lovecraft.

In keeping with the proportions of the 1938 edition, this new edition from the HPLHS measures 6 7/8 inches by 4 1/4 inches. 108 pages.  

Customer Reviews

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G
G.Z.
It's a treasure

I  love this little book. It is a glimpse into Howard's personal thoughts on story concepts and methodology of writing. Notes that were purely for his own eyes. Almost like peeking into a diary. I love the two cat-centric story ideas, one of which was inspired by a black cat friend that Howard knew in Providence for over 20 years. It is bittersweet to read these and wonder how they would have turned out if he hadn't been taken from us so soon. I am also reviewing the titles of his summaries of the weird fiction of other authors he admired, checking off those I've read and making a list of the others. This book is a treasure and very special!

G
G.Z.
It's a treasure

I love this little book. It is a glimpse into Howard's personal thoughts on story concepts and methodology of writing. Notes that were purely for his own eyes. Almost like peeking into a diary. I love the two cat-centric story ideas, one of which was inspired by a black friend that Howard knew in Providence for 20 years. It is bittersweet to read these and wonder how they would have turned out if he hadn't been taken from us so soon. I am also reviewing the titles of his summaries of the weird fiction of other authors he admired, checking off those I've read and making a list of the others. This book is a treasure and very special!

M
Mike Nusbaum
Wolderful

A neat little book to add to my collection. I purchased it on the recommendation of a friend and am glad I did. It's great to read HPL's thoughts on essential elements of weird fiction, story ideas and other thoughts. This is great to stir your imagination if you're a writer or game master looking for new ideas to entertain readers and players.

J
Jeremy L
It a little more insight into Lovecraft's writings

This is a cool little book that is filled with various notes and ideas. A must have for a true fan.

A
Adam
Very very cool little book

I gained some insight into Lovecraft's thinking about writing and the sources of his stories from his letters (five volumes in the rare books room at Penn State library rare books room). This book gave WAY more insight into his process as a writer.

This really shows that Lovecraft was a deeply thinking and methodical writer. It also helped me understand why he is light on plot and heavy on atmosphere/intuitive feeling of the protagonist. He was trying to convey the otherworldly mystery and excitement that the historical and sometimes decrepit places created in him. When he walked around he saw interesting places and wondered at what mystery was in it, or beyond it. At the atmosphere and imagined realities that might have been behind it being there. That little insight alone made Lovecraft's fiction make so much more sense to me. It wasn't just his nightmares and weird imagination, but the impact of the towns he lived in...and his writing wasn't usually trying to tell a story as much as convey his own wonder to the reader.